Personal and political decisions impact others

August 12, 2011 in Are there moral, ethical and spiritual dimensions to our economic woes?, Question of the Week by Burton Carley

These are fretful times. The economy seems to be in another tailspin. We’re witnessing gridlock in Washington, panic on Wall Street, riots in London, high unemployment and budget cuts all around. Are these difficulties strictly economic and political, or are there moral, ethical and spiritual dimensions to our economic woes? How are these difficulties affecting the people you serve?

One cannot separate the life of the spirit from how we are bound together either economically or politically. Whatever ails the spirit will also infect how we are in right relationship in all areas of our common life together as a people in a nation, state and city. If greed becomes our god or individualism at the expense of others then we will find ways to justify our self-interest no matter how ruinous to the greater good.

Rigid ideology and demonizing those with whom we disagree lead to dysfunction. Right ideas become more important than people. Statesmanship that serves the common good is abandoned for a partisanship willing to sacrifice others for a cause or party. Arrogance than cannot imagine being wrong takes the place of a humility that comes with being a public servant. Power that is not accountable is tempted toward corruption.

People can bear almost anything if they have a moral reason. People will make sacrifices if they are fair in scale and provide concrete results. Clarity in bipartisan leadership that offers hope rather than polarization will provide a way forward. Understanding how our personal and political decisions have an impact on others is essential to our being in right relationship with one another.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Much is required of one to whom much is given

August 12, 2011 in Are there moral, ethical and spiritual dimensions to our economic woes?, Question of the Week by Albert Kirk

These are fretful times. The economy seems to be in another tailspin. We’re witnessing gridlock in Washington, panic on Wall Street, riots in London, high unemployment and budget cuts all around. Are these difficulties strictly economic and political, or are there moral, ethical and spiritual dimensions to our economic woes? How are these difficulties affecting the people you serve?

There are moral, ethical and spiritual dimensions to every aspect of our lives. The role of the faith community is to do the hard work of discernment. To recognize what is going on in our communal lives, to name both grace and the presence of evil. The economy is not magic, even though its global manifestation is very complex. The economy is a human creation and we CAN do better. The finger of responsibility cuts across our usual lines of demarcation. Participants in every shade of political persuasion are called to conversion.

Two principles of Catholic Social Teaching seem to bear directly. One is concern for the most vulnerable. In some aspects the global economy seems weighted in favor of those who already have much. Should not the economy seek to bring others into this abundance? Another principle is the responsibility of every person to participate in communal life. Depending on one’s health and age, each person should share in the duties that we call “making a living.” At this moment, we need more jobs, so that all can make a contribution. Again, the Lord would seem to put responsibility on those already blessed who have the resources to create employment opportunities.
Much is required of the one to whom much is given.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Stealing from the poor

August 12, 2011 in Are there moral, ethical and spiritual dimensions to our economic woes?, Question of the Week by Val Handwerker

These are fretful times. The economy seems to be in another tailspin. We’re witnessing gridlock in Washington, panic on Wall Street, riots in London, high unemployment and budget cuts all around. Are these difficulties strictly economic and political, or are there moral, ethical and spiritual dimensions to our economic woes? How are these difficulties affecting the people you serve?

With a growing disparity between the very rich and the rest of the populace–in our own nation and abroad–the great saint in the early 400s captures the New Testament vision as regards economic woes: “Not to enable the poor to share in our goods is to steal from them and deprive them of life. The goods we possess are not ours, but theirs.That’s guidance–for politicians and for the rest of us as people of faith!

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

This world is not our home

August 12, 2011 in Are there moral, ethical and spiritual dimensions to our economic woes?, Question of the Week by David E. Leavell

These are fretful times. The economy seems to be in another tailspin. We’re witnessing gridlock in Washington, panic on Wall Street, riots in London, high unemployment and budget cuts all around. Are these difficulties strictly economic and political, or are there moral, ethical and spiritual dimensions to our economic woes? How are these difficulties affecting the people you serve?

Living within your means is a moral/ethical value that individuals and governments must learn.  If there is any consolation, we are not the only country deliberating issues of this magnitude.  Ultimately, we must understand that this world is not our home.  After this life we are ushered into eternity.  Living life with eternity in mind gives purpose, meaning, and significance.  If this life is all there is, there would be much depression and hopelessness.  When one understands eternity and forgiveness in Christ, one can be hopeful even in the midst of difficulty.  In Christ, we are overcomers!

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Our nation is great because we take care of those in need

August 12, 2011 in Are there moral, ethical and spiritual dimensions to our economic woes?, Question of the Week by Nicholas Vieron

These are fretful times. The economy seems to be in another tailspin. We’re witnessing gridlock in Washington, panic on Wall Street, riots in London, high unemployment and budget cuts all around. Are these difficulties strictly economic and political, or are there moral, ethical and spiritual dimensions to our economic woes? How are these difficulties affecting the people you serve?

Please forgive me for the following naive suggestion.

Why do people such as I who can’t balance my little checking account, are ready to give financial advice to the world? Of course the truth is, I can not.

But I can suggest something simple which no politician, for obvious reasons, would be ready to make. And that is this: Our Nation is in difficult financial straits. If some people on the low financial ladder, such as an old retired clergyman such as I, are ready and willing to have their taxes increased, why not all of us in a proportional manner be willing to support our Nation?

As a priest however, I would make this comment: Although history has shown that great nations, empires, have fallen, if we in this benevolent Nation which has been “the hope of the world” because of its humanitarian manifested efforts, continues to take care of those in need – for here is true religion: “to protect the
orphans, to embrace the widows, to feed the hungry….” – then we will eventually find ourselves liberated from this current financial problem.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Blind absolutism is a sign of failure

August 12, 2011 in Are there moral, ethical and spiritual dimensions to our economic woes?, Question of the Week by Mark Matheny

These are fretful times. The economy seems to be in another tailspin. We’re witnessing gridlock in Washington, panic on Wall Street, riots in London, high unemployment and budget cuts all around. Are these difficulties strictly economic and political, or are there moral, ethical and spiritual dimensions to our economic woes? How are these difficulties affecting the people you serve?

It is not enough simply to point out that we have been through hard times before and somehow we will make it through these. That might be true, but in many ways, we are in an unprecedented situation. Regardless, moral failure is rampant. One of the worst signs of that failure is in the blind absolutism of many politicians.

God help us! I believe God will, but we must embrace a unity borne of loving one another.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Will we place our hopes in government or God?

August 12, 2011 in Are there moral, ethical and spiritual dimensions to our economic woes?, Question of the Week, Spotlight Answers by Sandy Willson

These are fretful times. The economy seems to be in another tailspin. We’re witnessing gridlock in Washington, panic on Wall Street, riots in London, high unemployment and budget cuts all around. Are these difficulties strictly economic and political, or are there moral, ethical and spiritual dimensions to our economic woes? How are these difficulties affecting the people you serve?

The major issues in the news this past month have caused all of us to be deeply distressed: the financial/political woes of our nation; the economies of some European countries; the tragic situation in Somalia, Kenya, and Sudan; the brutal deaths in Oslo, Norway; and the deaths of twenty-five of our finest troops in Afghanistan.

In all of these circumstances, there are significant moral issues involved. For example: Will we love and share with our neighbors, even when times are tough?

Will we discipline ourselves individually and corporately to live within our means?

Will we love and respect and listen to people from opposing points of view?

But most importantly, will we place our hopes and our ambitions and our dreams in the temporal affairs of governments and strong leaders and world events, or will we place our hope squarely and solely on the One Who governs the universe?  The last book of the Bible, the Book of Revelation, is an enormous encouragement to us all. In Chapters 4 and 5, we read that John saw in his vision that God is gloriously reigning on His throne and has given to His Son, Jesus Christ,  the authority to reveal and execute that great plan, which is now taking place.  We, therefore, must live lives of loving service and truthfulness in the here and now, but with a sure and certain confidence that God is working everything out for His glory and for the welfare of His people. Anyone who puts his trust in Jesus Christ can be absolutely assured of that.

That’s the really big deal behind all the news this summer.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Entrusting ourselves to the hands of God

August 12, 2011 in Are there moral, ethical and spiritual dimensions to our economic woes?, Question of the Week by Warner Davis

These are fretful times. The economy seems to be in another tailspin. We’re witnessing gridlock in Washington, panic on Wall Street, riots in London, high unemployment and budget cuts all around. Are these difficulties strictly economic and political, or are there moral, ethical and spiritual dimensions to our economic woes? How are these difficulties affecting the people you serve?

There is a definite spiritual dimension.

The great theological thinkers Kierkegaard, Niebuhr, and Tillich tell us that the psychological state of anxiety is part of the human condition, Tillich attributing this state to our finiteness, Kierkegaard and Niebuhr to living in the tension of our finiteness and freedom. Since every human being experiences anxiety to some degree, small wonder that the worldly-wise philosophy “You have to have it all now or you will never have another chance” compounds it and drives us to overreach our limits and play God. Hence, the compulsion to live way beyond our financial means. Hence, today’s economic woes at private, corporate, and national levels.

So, to speak as a preacher to our economic woes, I would call for everyone to remember the distinction between the Creator and the creature. And, with this distinction in mind, I would call for us to entrust ourselves, not to our own creaturely hands, but to the all-loving and all-powerful hands of the Creator God. I would preach for such faith because it would restore perspective, inform economic choices, and make us responsible stewards.

As for moral and spiritual guidance for our political and economic leaders, I would commend the example of the head referee making a call by taking into account the perspectives of others because he could not see what happened from all the angles. It illustrates the value of listening to diverse perspectives on great problems before acting to resolve or manage them.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Is there no balm in Gilead?

August 12, 2011 in Are there moral, ethical and spiritual dimensions to our economic woes?, Question of the Week, Spotlight Answers by Stacy Spencer

These are fretful times. The economy seems to be in another tailspin. We’re witnessing gridlock in Washington, panic on Wall Street, riots in London, high unemployment and budget cuts all around. Are these difficulties strictly economic and political, or are there moral, ethical and spiritual dimensions to our economic woes? How are these difficulties affecting the people you serve?

The crops are in, the summer is over, but for us nothing’s changed. We’re still waiting to be rescued. For my dear broken people, I’m heartbroken. I weep, seized by grief. Are there no healing ointments in Gilead? Isn’t there a doctor in the house? So why can’t something be done to heal and save my dear people? ( Jeremiah 8:20-22 The Message)

I keep wondering if this intense heat will ever lift. Today there is a pleasant overcast with a promise of rain. I never thought I’d be relieved by an overcast. Many of us keep waiting for something to break while we sit under an overcast of dissension, political jockeying and economic uncertainty. All of the gains we made in the Dow Jones this year have been lost, our school system is closer to being consolidated but yet still divided, and people are still looking for work with threats of more layoffs. Memphis feels like Israel when Jeremiah said, “the harvest is past, the summer has ended and we are not saved. Since my people are crushed; I mourn and horror grips me.”

In the midst of all that is going wrong in our world, I’m still helpful that there is a balm in Memphis as well as the United States of America. Jeremiah asked a rhetorical question when he asked “Is there no balm in Gilead?” He knew there was a balm, that is a medicinal extract from a tree in Gilead, he just didn’t know why his people didn’t have access to it. We have the ability to create one equitable school system in Shelby County. Why are we still divided? We have the ability for every person to get healthcare. Why are we still arguing over Universal healthcare? We have the ability to bring our troops home. Why are we still fighting? We have the ability to create jobs by focusing our energies on rebuilding America’s infrastructure. Why are we sending more jobs overseas?

A house divided against itself cannot stand. The sooner we can come together for the good of the people, for the good of the children, for the good of the least of these we can see the balm or the healing we need for our city and nation. The way we see that relief get to where it’s need the most is to put into practice what God told Jeremiah for the people of Israel in Jeremiah 7:5-7: Change the way you are living and stop doing the things you are doing. Be fair in your treatment of one another.6 Stop taking advantage of aliens, orphans, and widows. Stop killing innocent people in this land. Stop worshiping other gods, for that will destroy you. 7 If you change, I will let you go on living here in the land which I gave your ancestors as a permanent possession.

The effects of healing in our city and our land have been blocked by self interest, partisan politics, and a lack of concern for the least of these. Whether it’s an unjust shooting by police officers in London, five million starving people in Somalia unable to get food and water, or unemployed teachers in Memphis, we must put our difference to the side and create an equitable school system, create jobs for our people, bring our troops home, and work together for liberty and justice for all. In short we must heed what God said to us in 2 Chronicles 7:14: 14 if my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and I will forgive their sin and will heal their land. New International Version (NIV)

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Economic woes and Biblical principles

August 12, 2011 in Are there moral, ethical and spiritual dimensions to our economic woes?, Question of the Week, Spotlight Answers by Peter Gathje

These are fretful times. The economy seems to be in another tailspin. We’re witnessing gridlock in Washington, panic on Wall Street, riots in London, high unemployment and budget cuts all around. Are these difficulties strictly economic and political, or are there moral, ethical and spiritual dimensions to our economic woes? How are these difficulties affecting the people you serve?

Biblical economics has three fundamental principles, both of which are being largely ignored in the economic policies and practices of the United States and indeed the world today.

The first of these principles is that the economy is to serve people rather than people serve the economy.  Another way to put this is that the economy is not God, and human beings are not slaves to economic life.  Instead, as both the stories of Genesis and Exodus show, the economy is part of God’s creation over which human beings are to exercise stewardship.  This principle of human liberation and stewardship urges that people come before profits, that compassion and justice come before competition, and that we need to respect both our dignity and our limitations as creatures in relation to the whole of God’s creation.

The second of those principles is that in God’s bounteous creation there is more than enough for everybody if people do not hoard but rather share.  This might be called the Manna Principle after the story of the manna in the desert.  The Israelites were fed by God, but they were commanded to not keep what they did not need for that day. The same Manna Principle is evident in the feeding miracles of Jesus in the New Testament in which he feeds large crowds with evidently little in the way of food. He begins by thanking God for the food that is present, and then commands his disciples to begin sharing the food. Lo and behold, there is more than enough for everybody.

The third principle of biblical economics has been called the Preferential Option for the Poor. This principle urges that all economic institutions and decisions are to be evaluated by how they help or harm the poor. Jesus, in Matthew 25:31-46, clearly states that the nations will be judged by how they treat “the least of these.” By this standard our national and world economy are utter failures.

Evaluating our economy and the world’s economy by these three principles it is no wonder that we are experiencing economic woes.  God has revealed to us in many stories, commandments, and prophetic pronouncements that our economic life is to be guided by these three principles, and we are by and large ignoring them.  We will flourish economically if we live by these principles.  We will destroy ourselves if we do not.

Each day at Manna House, a place of hospitality for homeless people, I see firsthand the destruction caused by the ignoring of these three principles. Many of our guests have been broken physically, emotionally, and spiritually by slave-like work that paid little, demanded too much, and cared nothing for their well being as humans.  Such work is part and parcel of system of greed that violates the Liberation and Stewardship Principle along with the Manna Principle.  Their lack of access to housing, medical care, mental health care, food, and clothing reveals the continuing violation of the Preferential Option for the Poor.

How might we begin to turn things around, to change our economy to reflect these three principles? There is need for both political organizing and personal change. Consistent with the first principle of liberation and stewardship, people of faith must reject any economics that would put human dignity second to economic life.  Corporate capitalism is as bad as communism. Both overly centralize economic power to the detriment of human dignity.

Thus consistent with the Manna Principle, we must work to decentralize economic power through re-distributing of wealth, breaking up of monopolies, and encouraging local production and consumption of goods.

And finally, reflecting the Preferential Option for the Poor, we must create an economic life that cares especially for those least able to care for themselves, and also one that does not exploit and victimize people in the first place.

None of these goals are easily attainable.  Our current economic system took years to build and will not go away without years of political and economic agitation. But we can begin by choosing political leaders who will seek to craft economic policy ever closer to those three principles, and by creating in our own lives alternatives to the dominant economic structures.   We can already begin to refuse to be defined by economic life, to redistribute wealth, to produce and buy locally, and to share our lives with the poor. There is no law against any of those, but there is biblical support for each.  We can build a new economy from the ground up.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail