Aging an adventure

March 1, 2014 in Featured Question of the Week, Growing Older, Question of the Week, Spotlight Answers by David Comperry

Every stage of life has its pains and difficulties; but every stage has its blessings and opportunities as well. I believe the key to living joyfully as you grow older is to recognize each day as a gift from God and a chance to discover the blessings hidden in it. When you have a purpose in each day, and that purpose is to share the love of God with others, aging becomes less of a burden and more of an adventure, less something to be feared and more a reality to be embraced.

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A spiritual life

March 1, 2014 in Featured Question of the Week, Growing Older, Question of the Week, Spotlight Answers by Bob McBride

David O. McKay, past president and prophet of the Church:

“The only thing which places man above the beasts of the field is his possession of spiritual gifts. Man’s earthly existence is but a test as to whether he will concentrate his efforts, his mind, his soul upon things which contribute to the comfort and gratification of his physical instincts and passions, or whether he will make as his life’s end and purpose the acquisition of spiritual qualities.”

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A lifelong student

March 1, 2014 in Featured Question of the Week, Growing Older, Question of the Week, Spotlight Answers by Burton Carley

At any age, I urge the congregation to practice memento mori (“Remember that you will die.”) As for aging, what is inevitable for the body is not for the spirit, which may always keep the mind of the student.

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Less stuff, more giving, God

March 1, 2014 in Featured Question of the Week, Growing Older, Question of the Week, Spotlight Answers by Sonia Walker

Living longer challenges us to think about aging based on one’s health status, social adaptability, financial and social resources, rather than the number of years lived.

I see the art of living longer with quality like nested Russian dolls.

Meet mine: Pursue self-care, de-clutter trash and treasures, be forgiving of self and others, give generously, share life with whomever God sends, reclaim or deepen your relationship with creation and Creator, let go and let God surround you with love.

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Love people, not things

March 1, 2014 in Featured Question of the Week, Growing Older, Question of the Week, Spotlight Answers by Mark Matheny

My wife, Emily, and I had a marvelous mentor early on in our relationship: Rev. J.L. Niell. He worked long after his first retirement as a campus minister and lived into his 90s with great joie de vivre. I remember that one of his many kind of personal proverbs was something like “Do not love things, love people.”

Now that I’m quite a bit older myself, I try to remember that, and like our hero J.L., to spend time listening and paying attention to children and youths as they look to futures beyond our generation.

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Only old once

March 1, 2014 in Featured Question of the Week, Growing Older, Question of the Week, Spotlight Answers by Will Jones

I learned from my grandmother, Lelia Jones, to laugh at yourself no matter what. One of Dr. Seuss’ last books was her favorite, and she read from it at her 90th birthday: “You’re Only Old Once. “ In true Seussian rhyme and form, it provides a humorous account of aging in our culture, especially in regard to medical care. I like the way it ends: “When at last we are sure you’ve been properly pilled, then a few paper forms must be properly filled — so that you and your heirs may be properly billed. And you’ll know, once your necktie’s back under your chin … you’re in pretty good shape for the shape you are in!”

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Help thy neighbor

March 1, 2014 in Featured Question of the Week, Growing Older, Question of the Week, Spotlight Answers by Sally Jones Heinz

We all naturally have resistance to yielding some of our independence and accepting help for things we once could do by ourselves. But especially in an increasingly complex society, it is wise to focus on the things we can do and also to make use of resources that connect us with others — not just our comfortable circle of friends and family, but also people and organizations we may have never known.

Gracefully giving up our need to control all aspects of our lives opens us up to new opportunities to share our gifts with others and to stimulate new vitality for ourselves.

Recent research from the Plough Foundation shows:

Neighbors can play a major role in helping one another, a win-win situation with no cost to governmental agencies or charities;

In Shelby County, 83 percent of seniors said they and their neighbors routinely help one another with errands or chores; and

Approximately 90 percent of seniors feel their neighbors are honest, trustworthy and willing to help.

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Don’t rust out; burn out

March 1, 2014 in Featured Question of the Week, Growing Older, Question of the Week, Spotlight Answers by Matt Anzivino

My 82-year-old mother taught herself how to play the piano at 70. She walks 3 miles every day. She averages 145 in bowling. She golfs, ministers at the neighborhood nursing home every week, as well as the local prison. I could go on and on. She certainly lives up to her advice: “Don’t rust out; burn out!”

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Better, not bitter

March 1, 2014 in Featured Question of the Week, Growing Older, Question of the Week, Spotlight Answers by Brandon Porter

Psalms 37:25: “I have been young, and now am old; yet have I not seen the righteous forsaken, nor his seed begging bread.” This implies that getting old is a blessing. So my advice to those of us who are blessed to be 55 and older: Don’t get bitter; get better.

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The age of God

March 1, 2014 in Featured Question of the Week, Growing Older, Question of the Week, Spotlight Answers by Alex Wellford

I find it helpful to be reminded that the person of God’s creating — each of us — is neither young nor old, not in God’s eyes. Perhaps it should not be any different when we see others. When John, James and Peter saw Jesus, Elijah and Moses together during the transfiguration, I doubt that they gave any thought to the ages of the people they saw.

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